• Der Seekrieg in der Adria 1914-1918

    Maritime operations in the Mediterranean and Adriatic during the First World War were sometimes considered and described in Anglo-American and German history books as secondary, although they were important not only for the states that lay on their coasts, but also for the fate of the great empires whose maritime traffic passed through these areas.
    The constant competition between the British Royal Navy and the then still new German Imperial Navy, whose emergence and rapid development posed a challenge to Great Britain as ruler of the seas, attracted attention to the operations in the North Sea and overshadowed events on other seas.
    In addition to the operations on the Adriatic Sea, some important operations in the Mediterranean, the Aegean, the Dardanelles and the Sea of Marmara are briefly described here, because they tied up numerous ships of the Entente and prevented their work on the Adriatic, which facilitated the situation of the Austro-Hungarian Navy.
    With 374 b/w pictures.

    48,00 
  • Deutsche Grosse Kreuzer und Panzerkreuzer

    From a total of fifteen Large Cruisers of the German Imperial Navy, six vessels were large cruisers protected by an armored deck only, with other nine being armored cruisers. From the latter category two prototypes were built, followed by three series of two ships each, and by one final single vessel, that represented the zenith of this type built for the Imperial Navy. Six oldest protected cruisers were removed from the frontline service early in the WW I, but from nine armored cruisers six were sunk during the war, with two best-known – Scharnhorst and Gneisenau – being lost in the South Atlantic, and the newest armored cruiser – Blücher – during a battle in the North Sea, also fighting against a more powerful adversary, the battlecruisers.
    The already well-known maritime author Zvonimir Freivogel is in this richly illustrated book describing the development of the German and foreign armored cruisers as well, the vessels that were having their zenith in the late 19th and early 20th Century, to be made obsolete by the battlecruisers. In addition to the overview of technical data of the German Large Cruisers (from Kaiserin Augusta to Blücher), their less-known missions, as they also took part at international Missions, and their training cruises on all World´s oceans before the WW I are listed in detail, together with the operations executed during the war and with their final fates.
    With 221 illustrations.

    45,00 
  • Die Österreichisch-Ungarische Donauflottille im Ersten Weltkrieg

    Austria-Hungary also was known as the Danube Monarchy, because the Danube River, as an important transport route, connected several lands of the monarchy with each other and with the Black Sea as well. The river served at the same time as a frontier with some less stable neighbors, and during the presence of Turkey on the Balkans, the Austrian Empire had at its disposal a strong Danube flotilla with sail- and rudder-driven warships.
    In the second half of the 19th century began the building of a Imperial and Royal Danube Flotilla equipped with steam-driven warships. During the World War One, Austria-Hungary operated ten monitors on the Danube, together with a score of patrol boats, armed steamers, and auxiliary warships.
    The history and fates of all these vessels are given here, together with the history of their development, with technical data and numerous illustrations, supplemented by an extensive list of sources and literature, to enable the search for further details.
    103 b/w pictures, 142 b/w drawings/line-drawings, 4 maps, 15 colour illustrations.

    34,00 
  • Large Cruisers of the German Imperial Navy

    From a total of fifteen Large Cruisers of the German Imperial Navy, six vessels were large cruisers protected by an armored deck only, with other nine being armored cruisers. From the latter category two prototypes were built, followed by three series of two ships each, and by one final single vessel, that represented the zenith of this type built for the Imperial Navy. Six oldest protected cruisers were removed from the frontline service early in the WW I, but from nine armored cruisers six were sunk during the war, with two best-known – Scharnhorst and Gneisenau – being lost in the South Atlantic, and the newest armored cruiser – Blücher – during a battle in the North Sea, also fighting against a more powerful adversary, the battlecruisers.
    The already well-known maritime author Zvonimir Freivogel is in this richly illustrated book describing the development of the German and foreign armored cruisers as well, the vessels that were having their zenith in the late 19th and early 20th Century, to be made obsolete by the battlecruisers. In addition to the overview of technical data of the German Large Cruisers (from Kaiserin Augusta to Blücher), their less-known missions, as they also took part at international Missions, and their training cruises on all World´s oceans before the WW I are listed in detail, together with the operations executed during the war and with their final fates.
    With 221 illustrations.

    45,00 
  • Österreichisch-Ungarische Unterseeboote

    Also available in ENGLISH language for the same price, please write us an e-mail!!
    Austro-Hungarian submarines appeared late on the world´ scene and many of these were small and/or obsolete, but in spite of this they were successfully operating on the Adriatic and in the Eastern Mediterranean. From six trial submarines built during the decade before the First World War and joined by a seventh, being built on speculation and bought finally by the Imperial and Royal Navy, two were not of no use as fighting boats and other three were lost during the war.
    The group of five bigger submarines (being built in Germany after an Austro-German design) was sold there, as it was believed that they cannot reach the Adriatic during the war. Five small German UB I boats bought instead were not really a replacement for these custom-built boats, but were still useful as training vessels and small attack boats, operating in enemy waters and sinking there one enemy submarine and one torpedo boat. Four coastal boats of the Havmanden Type were a waste of time and resources needed to build them, but eight boats of the German UB II Type, built in license in Austria-Hungary and joined by two more units of German origin, were finally able – together with one salvaged and repaired French boat of the Laubeuf Type – to operate outside of the Adriatic too.
    The author is describing the development of the Austro-Hungarian submarines, including their descriptions, technical data and short operational histories in WW I, and their fates during the war and afterwards. In addition there is a list of all German submarines operating under the Austro-Hungarian flag and temporary Austro-Hungarian designations, during the time as Germany was not at war with Italy, a former ally. There are more than 200 illustrations with numerous tables on the building and technical data, making this book an interesting addition to the libraries of warship´ and submarine´ enthusiasts and historians as well.
    With 238 b/w and Colour pictures.

    45,00 
  • Österreichisch-Ungarische Zerstörer im Ersten Weltkrieg

    During World War One the Austro-Hungarian destroyers were almost daily at sea, together with the scout cruisers and torpedo boats, to accomplish various tasks, beginning with the anti-submarine warfare, over mine sweeping and laying, to the attacks on the enemy maritime communications or on the Otranto Barrage vessels. They were used to support A-H seaplanes returning from their missions against the enemy coast as well, to help the machines after an emergency landing on sea, and to tow them back to harbor or to rescue their crews.
    This richly illustrated book describes all A-H destroyers – called torpedo vessels in the A-H parlance – from the first prototypes to the last unrealized projects. The best and most efficient vessels of the Tátra and Ersatz Triglav classes were equal to destroyers of other navies – French, Italian and British – operating in the Adriatic and could compete with stronger enemies too. Older destroyers of the Huszár class were also very active, together with the much older torpedo gunboats or destroyer predecessors built in the late 19th Century. All these ships are described in detail, with building and tactical & technical data in respective tables, together with the operational history of every A-H destroyer from the commissioning to the end of their service.
    With 170 b/w pictures.

    45,00 
  • Schnellboote 1916 – 2016. 100 Jahre deutscher Torpedo- und Flugkörper-Schnellboote

    The Schnellboote were not often described in detail by the Anglo-American naval authors, and even the origin of the designation E-boats is not completely clear. It is believed that the meaning was “Enemy Boats”, but there were other German vessels belonging to the “boat” category (like the motor minesweepers, called R-Boote by the Germans and R-boats by the Allies, or minesweepers aka M–Boote/M-boats). Thus it is possible that the initial meaning was simply Express Boats, similar to Express Trains (Schnellzüge in German), and later the origin of the name was forgotten.
    The book Schnellboote, written by the already well-known naval author Zvonimir Freivogel, is divided into four parts, the first is about the genesis and the development of this warship category in Germany, the second an overview of all S-boat operations on the European war theaters between 1939 and 1945, the third is describing these vessels in the Bundesmarine, and the fourth is a short history of S-boats in the Volksmarine. The book is richly illustrated with over 200 photographs, drawings, and charts, and there are numerous tables with technical and building data, together with fates of all German wartime or post-war fast attack craft.

    45,00