The Aviation Historian Issue 44: Rise & Fall. The Political Death of the TSR.2

19,95 

Content of Issue No. 44:

3 EDITOR’S LETTER

6 AIR CORRESPONDENCE
10 HEALEY’S AXE: THE CANCELLATION OF THE TSR.2.
It’s the “great lost project” that everyone has an opinion
on nearly 60 years after its demise; Prof Keith Hayward
FRAeS examines the BAC TSR.2’s political life and death

18 PATTON VS THE JABOS.
Luftwaffe specialists Dr Andrew Arthy and Morten Jessen
commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Allied invasion of
Sicily with a look at the events of one afternoon in August
1943 from the perspective of Fw 190 Jabo unit II./SKG 10

28 THE FLYING W IN CANADA.
American manufacturer Bellanca’s rugged, capacious
Aircruiser — known as the “Flying W” for its distinctive
sesquiplane configuration — proved invaluable in
Canada’s great frozen north, as Peter Marshall relates

38 A QUESTION OF SCALEABILITY
. How did the Wright brothers “future-proof” their approach
to manned, controlled, powered flight while others failed
to? Philip Jarrett HonCRAes offers an important insight

44 BLOODHOUND.
Continuing our series on British aerial weapons, master
illustrator Ian Bott joins forces with Chris Gibson to detail
the history and extraordinary technical aspects of the
Bristol Bloodhound, Britain’s stalwart surface-to-air guided
missile that stood sentinel throughout the Cold War

56 EXCESSIVE FORCE Pt 2
. Lennart Andersson concludes his two-part series on the
attacks made by Japanese military aircraft on the airliners
of China’s CNAC and Eurasia companies during 1937–41

66 GIRLS CAN WIN WINGS!
It is a little-known fact that more than 40 women pilots with
no flying experience were trained “from scratch” by the Air
Transport Auxiliary during the war, as Ray Flude reveals

78 THE VULCANS ARE COMING!
In the first half of a two-part article in this issue, Mariano
Sciaroni surveys Argentina’s mainland air defences in
1982, when the outbreak of the Falklands conflict raised
the fear that airbases there could be hit by RAF Vulcans . . .

87 AN OCEAN APART: THE BRITISH PERSPECTIVE
. . . and in the second half Chris Gibson compares what
the British knew about Argentina’s mainland air-defence
capability based on their own intelligence assets

92 THE PULHAM COASTALS.
Airship specialist Brian J. Turpin MRAeS charts the short
and perilous careers of the three RNAS Coastal-class
airships operated from Pulham in Norfolk during 1916–17

102 AOA’S FLAGSHIP CONNIES.
Greg Smith untangles the numerous “Flagship” names
given to American Overseas Airlines’ seven-strong fleet of
Lockheed Model 049 Constellations during 1946–50

114 ARMCHAIR AVIATION

119 LOST & FOUND

120 STRIVING FOR ACCURACY Pt 2.
James Jackson concludes his two-parter on the RAF’s
post-war drive to increase bombing efficiency with the
development of air-launched guided weapons

130 OFF THE BEATEN TRACK

Content of Issue No. 44:

3 EDITOR’S LETTER

6 AIR CORRESPONDENCE
10 HEALEY’S AXE: THE CANCELLATION OF THE TSR.2.
It’s the “great lost project” that everyone has an opinion
on nearly 60 years after its demise; Prof Keith Hayward
FRAeS examines the BAC TSR.2’s political life and death

18 PATTON VS THE JABOS.
Luftwaffe specialists Dr Andrew Arthy and Morten Jessen
commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Allied invasion of
Sicily with a look at the events of one afternoon in August
1943 from the perspective of Fw 190 Jabo unit II./SKG 10

28 THE FLYING W IN CANADA.
American manufacturer Bellanca’s rugged, capacious
Aircruiser — known as the “Flying W” for its distinctive
sesquiplane configuration — proved invaluable in
Canada’s great frozen north, as Peter Marshall relates

38 A QUESTION OF SCALEABILITY
. How did the Wright brothers “future-proof” their approach
to manned, controlled, powered flight while others failed
to? Philip Jarrett HonCRAes offers an important insight

44 BLOODHOUND.
Continuing our series on British aerial weapons, master
illustrator Ian Bott joins forces with Chris Gibson to detail
the history and extraordinary technical aspects of the
Bristol Bloodhound, Britain’s stalwart surface-to-air guided
missile that stood sentinel throughout the Cold War

56 EXCESSIVE FORCE Pt 2
. Lennart Andersson concludes his two-part series on the
attacks made by Japanese military aircraft on the airliners
of China’s CNAC and Eurasia companies during 1937–41

66 GIRLS CAN WIN WINGS!
It is a little-known fact that more than 40 women pilots with
no flying experience were trained “from scratch” by the Air
Transport Auxiliary during the war, as Ray Flude reveals

78 THE VULCANS ARE COMING!
In the first half of a two-part article in this issue, Mariano
Sciaroni surveys Argentina’s mainland air defences in
1982, when the outbreak of the Falklands conflict raised
the fear that airbases there could be hit by RAF Vulcans . . .

87 AN OCEAN APART: THE BRITISH PERSPECTIVE
. . . and in the second half Chris Gibson compares what
the British knew about Argentina’s mainland air-defence
capability based on their own intelligence assets

92 THE PULHAM COASTALS.
Airship specialist Brian J. Turpin MRAeS charts the short
and perilous careers of the three RNAS Coastal-class
airships operated from Pulham in Norfolk during 1916–17

102 AOA’S FLAGSHIP CONNIES.
Greg Smith untangles the numerous “Flagship” names
given to American Overseas Airlines’ seven-strong fleet of
Lockheed Model 049 Constellations during 1946–50

114 ARMCHAIR AVIATION

119 LOST & FOUND

120 STRIVING FOR ACCURACY Pt 2.
James Jackson concludes his two-parter on the RAF’s
post-war drive to increase bombing efficiency with the
development of air-launched guided weapons

130 OFF THE BEATEN TRACK

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