• The Aviation Historian Issue 42: Firestreak!

    Inhalt von #42:
    – Editior’s Letter
    – Air Correspondence
    – Selling to Saddam (UK government was invloved in plans to supply a cutting-edge jet fighter design to Iraq)
    – Dirty Work, Pt 2 (napalm, pesticides, defoliants)
    – Swedish company Götaverken
    – The aicraft carrier HMS Eagle & The Chilean Connection
    – Firestreak! (de Havilland’s BLUE JAY air-to-air-missile)
    – The Story of UTA, Pt. 2 (France’s post-war independant airline UNION DE TRANPORTS AÉRIENS)
    – A Real Australian… (a guy born in Australia with Chinese heritage was flying the RAAF’s first night combat sortie in the Boomerang and later became a civilian test pilot for CAC)
    – Wings are the Wheels of tomorrow! (Evolution of British freighter aircraft form the 1920s to the late 1940s)
    – Storming Performance (the author examines the the perennial powerplant issues of the Westland Whirlwind).
    – Breguet’s Monsters (the LEVIATHANS, the series of giant transport biplanes designed by L. Breguet after WW I)
    – Ghost Fortresses Of The Apocalypse, Pt. 2 (USAF’s use of unmanned B-17s during atomic weapons testing in the immediate post-war period)
    – Armchair Aviation
    – Lost & Found
    – It’s All About That Base
    – Off The Beaten Track

    19,95 
  • The Aviation Historian Issue 43: Small is Beautiful?

    Content:
    Content:
    – Editor’s letter
    – Air Correspondence
    – Teddy Petter & The Case for Shorter Steps /Prof. K. Hayward FRAeS explores the UK’s 1950s procurement dilemma
    – Excessive Force, pt. 1 /The attacks made by Japanese military aircraft on the airliners of China’s CNAC and Eurasia companies during 1937-41
    – A Revolutionary Approach / British aerial weapons: Iain R. Murray takes a technical look at the UPKEEP weapon used in the famous Dambusters raid 80 years ago
    – OOH-Là-Là, C’est le Quatre-Mille! / Dassault’s Super Mirage 4000, relating how the cutting-edge delta combat aircraft became victim of a classically French existential crisis
    – Raisng Steam / During 1898-1912 Swedish inventor C. R. Nyberg turned his attention to building steam-powered flying-machines
    – Striving for Accuracy, Pt. 1 / RAF’s post-war drive to increase bombing efficiency and the development of new systems for conventional bombing
    – Spartan’s Olympic Hopeful / The elegant 1930s Spartan Executive light tourer is well-known, but it also was used as the basis for an armed military version
    – Storming Performance pt. 2 / Westland Whirlwind fighter: P. Stoddart FRAeS considers, whether fitting new engines might have made the difference
    – Full Tilt / The Weser P.16 tiltrotor
    – Wings are the Wheels of Today / The slow development of British freighter aircraft to a close with a survey of the wartime designs mooted by forward-thinking manufacturers
    – Argentina’s Big Cats / Grumman Panther jet fighter into service in 1958 and later swept-wing Cougar
    – Nimewacs Anyone? / RAF aircraft with the search for a moniker for the ill-starred British Aerospace Nimrod AEW.3
    – Armchair Aviation
    – Lost & Found
    – My First Deck Landing
    – Off the Beaten Track

    19,95 
  • The Aviation Historian Issue 44: Rise & Fall. The Political Death of the TSR.2

    Content of Issue No. 44:

    3 EDITOR’S LETTER

    6 AIR CORRESPONDENCE
    10 HEALEY’S AXE: THE CANCELLATION OF THE TSR.2.
    It’s the “great lost project” that everyone has an opinion
    on nearly 60 years after its demise; Prof Keith Hayward
    FRAeS examines the BAC TSR.2’s political life and death

    18 PATTON VS THE JABOS.
    Luftwaffe specialists Dr Andrew Arthy and Morten Jessen
    commemorate the 80th anniversary of the Allied invasion of
    Sicily with a look at the events of one afternoon in August
    1943 from the perspective of Fw 190 Jabo unit II./SKG 10

    28 THE FLYING W IN CANADA.
    American manufacturer Bellanca’s rugged, capacious
    Aircruiser — known as the “Flying W” for its distinctive
    sesquiplane configuration — proved invaluable in
    Canada’s great frozen north, as Peter Marshall relates

    38 A QUESTION OF SCALEABILITY
    . How did the Wright brothers “future-proof” their approach
    to manned, controlled, powered flight while others failed
    to? Philip Jarrett HonCRAes offers an important insight

    44 BLOODHOUND.
    Continuing our series on British aerial weapons, master
    illustrator Ian Bott joins forces with Chris Gibson to detail
    the history and extraordinary technical aspects of the
    Bristol Bloodhound, Britain’s stalwart surface-to-air guided
    missile that stood sentinel throughout the Cold War

    56 EXCESSIVE FORCE Pt 2
    . Lennart Andersson concludes his two-part series on the
    attacks made by Japanese military aircraft on the airliners
    of China’s CNAC and Eurasia companies during 1937–41

    66 GIRLS CAN WIN WINGS!
    It is a little-known fact that more than 40 women pilots with
    no flying experience were trained “from scratch” by the Air
    Transport Auxiliary during the war, as Ray Flude reveals

    78 THE VULCANS ARE COMING!
    In the first half of a two-part article in this issue, Mariano
    Sciaroni surveys Argentina’s mainland air defences in
    1982, when the outbreak of the Falklands conflict raised
    the fear that airbases there could be hit by RAF Vulcans . . .

    87 AN OCEAN APART: THE BRITISH PERSPECTIVE
    . . . and in the second half Chris Gibson compares what
    the British knew about Argentina’s mainland air-defence
    capability based on their own intelligence assets

    92 THE PULHAM COASTALS.
    Airship specialist Brian J. Turpin MRAeS charts the short
    and perilous careers of the three RNAS Coastal-class
    airships operated from Pulham in Norfolk during 1916–17

    102 AOA’S FLAGSHIP CONNIES.
    Greg Smith untangles the numerous “Flagship” names
    given to American Overseas Airlines’ seven-strong fleet of
    Lockheed Model 049 Constellations during 1946–50

    114 ARMCHAIR AVIATION

    119 LOST & FOUND

    120 STRIVING FOR ACCURACY Pt 2.
    James Jackson concludes his two-parter on the RAF’s
    post-war drive to increase bombing efficiency with the
    development of air-launched guided weapons

    130 OFF THE BEATEN TRACK

    19,95 
  • The Aviation Historian Issue 45: Snow Patrol. An American in the RAF

    Content:

    • 3 EDITOR’S LETTER
    • 6 AIR CORRESPONDENCE
    • 10 THE TIPPING POINT. In March 1943 Allied airpower combined to devastating effect against Japan’s vital supply lines between New Britain and New Guinea. Jarryd Cripps marks the 80th anniversary of the oft-forgotten Battle of the Bismarck Sea
    • 22 THE AMLINGER CASE. When young widow Ellen Amlinger jumped to her death from a Lufthansa Dornier in August 1930, theories swirled about her late husband’s involvement in a secret German

    aircraft project in Russia. Lennart Andersson investigates

    • 28 OPERATION AGILA. Guy Ellis takes a look at the peacekeeping air operations of the Commonwealth Monitoring Force during a ceasefire and elections in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe during 1979 – 80
    • 40 THE VICKERS ARE COMING! Continuing our series on British aerial weapons, master illustrator Ian Bott joins forces with Mark Russell to detail the evolution and technical aspects of the ubiquitous

    Vickers machine-gun, the RAF’s standard fighter armament from the First World War through to the Second

    • 52 OPERATION CONVERTIBLE. In the 1990s the British Army explored using airships as surveillance platforms in Northern Ireland. Professor Keith Hayward FRAeS examines the political and practical

    difficulties involved, and why it ultimately came to nothing

    • 64 TODAY’S PROJECT, TOMORROW’S ACHIEVEMENT?. British manufacturer Cunliffe-Owen Aircraft is mainly known for the pre-war oddball OA-1 and the post-war Concordia – but the company also designed a four-engined transatlantic airliner, as Ralph Pegram reveals
    • 74 NORTH AMERICAN’S CLASS OF ’54. With the help of a June 1954 company brochure, Tony Buttler AMRAeS explores North American Aviation’s conceptualisation of a series of state-of-the-art military jet aircraft for the burgeoning Cold War
    • 84 GULFSTREAMING. In 1971 Brian J. Turpin MRAeS joined the Ford Motor Company’s air services division to fly the elegant Gulfstream I turboprop. He recalls what it was like to fly
    • 96 ANY OLD IRON? Ricardo M. Lezon and Matthew Willis relate how an Argentinian Navy delegation inspected a cache of stored Seafires in the UK with a view to acquiring them in 1955
    • 106 A YANK IN THE RAF. In 1979 Col John W. Zink swapped his USAF F-4 Phantom for an RAF Harrier GR.3 when he accepted a placing on an officer exchange programme to fly with No 1 (F) Sqn
    • 116 ARMCHAIR AVIATION
    • 122 LOST & FOUND EXTRA: THE MILLERS‘ TALE. In an extended Lost & Found, Philip Jarrett HonnCRAeS traces the story of a pair of ornithopters, both apparently the creation of a Mr Miller – or were there two Mr Millers?
    • 126 BEWARE „THE LEANS“! The late Cdr John Ford’s recollections of his naval flying

    career continue with Sea Hawk dive-bombing – at night

    • 130 OFF THE BEATEN TRACK
    19,95